Christy Rosario ’19, Music Business and Industry

She’s Gained Broad Skills for a Career from Diverse Real-World Experiences

Christy Rosario ’19 realized early on at NVU-Lyndon that the best way for her to gain valuable hands-on experience to succeed in her career is by being willing to take on a wide range of new challenges.  

By taking advantage of internships and jumping into several jobs at NVU, she has developed solid skills and built confidence in her abilities. “I’ve learned to be a lot more ready to get into things even if I haven’t done something before. Just getting in there is the best way to learn,” she says.

Touring with James Taylor Adds to Her Impressive Resume    

That approach landed Christy, a music business and industry (MBI) major, two summer internships as a production assistant touring with James Taylor and his band. “I gave it everything I could. I was happy to work with that caliber of artist and crew,” she says. “By the second summer, I felt a lot of confidence…It really solidified that I like to be in that kind of environment and in a touring position. I like the long hours because you’re part of something bigger. Everyone has to pull their weight for the show to go on.”

MBI Students Build Skills Running Annual Campus Music Festival 

Christy has pulled her weight with other shows, too, including GreggFest, the largest music event at NVU-Lyndon each year. Students involved with NVU’s chapter of the Music & Entertainment Industry Student Association (MEISA) organize GreggFest and other events from the ground up. Christy was involved with stagehand duties, lighting, and sound for GreggFest.     

“It was a cool opportunity for me to get my feet wet with a larger-scale show. It’s exciting to work with such a devoted team. Everyone is very passionate about it,” she says.

She credits MEISA with providing a platform for her to broaden her skills in real-world settings. “MEISA has offered the most direct hands-on benefits for me from the very beginning of my time here,” Christy says. “It has opened so many doors to opportunities for me,” including sound engineering, booking shows, and touring with bands.

Faculty Experience and Connections in the Field Lead to Internships, Jobs 

With teamwork a key part of the music business, Christy has seen rewards for doing her part. “This is definitely an industry where the work pays off,” she says.  

Part of her payoff has been that faculty, impressed by her skills, have hired her for their own events. That’s one way MBI students benefit from the connections and deep experience their professors have in the music industry.    

Christy helped with set design and other tasks for a Boston event produced by The Mighty Mighty BossTones, founded by MBI professor and bass player Joe Gittleman. Another professor hired Christy for an audio technician internship with Wanderlust, an international, touring yoga and music festival he was involved with, and she plans to work at the festival again after she graduates.

She was also an audio engineer for a theater production of Vermont-based JAG Productions for the annual Discover Jazz Festival in Burlington, Vermont, a job she got through a professor’s connection.

Prepared for Her Career

After she graduates, Christy, from New Britain, Connecticut, wants to tour full time, preferably as an audio engineer. The diverse experiences she’s had through NVU have broadened her skills to make her more marketable. “It’s about being versatile and trying new things, recognizing that even if you don’t know 100 percent what you’re getting into, be ready to learn,” she says.

Her supportive professors have pushed her to learn. “It’s motivating to see a lot of professors here do real-world things as well as teaching,” Christy says. “You can tell the faculty and staff are here because they want to be.”

The enthusiasm inspires students.

“If you’re willing to put in the work, the MBI program is one of the most rewarding experiences you can have,” Christy says. “The culture in the program is indicative of the culture in the industry, and a lot of people here have the right attitude — they really care about what they’re doing and what they’re part of.”